How to Cook & Eat Acorn Squash


Oh my gourd, do we love our winter squashes!

And how do we love thee, acorn squash? Let us count the ways…

We love you cut into halves, slices, wedges, cubes, and pretty flower-shaped rings! We love you sweet or savory, roasted or baked, grilled or fried!

There are so many ways to enjoy this pretty veggie – but if you’re here, you’re probably wondering how to choose, store, cut, cook, and eat the pretty acorn squash…

Well, no worries, because this F.N. sharp guide’s got you covered with all of the acorn prepping and cooking tips, plus a follow-along video recipe! 

Here’s what you’ll learn in this guide:

The F.N. Sharp Guide to Cutting, Cooking & Eating Acorn Squash

When it comes to winter squashes, you probably already know about that butternut squash that makes a delicious soup, or that spaghetti squash that makes a low-carb substitute for pasta, or that pumpkin squash that makes delicious pumpkin, well, everything – but what about that acorn squash? What is it and what does it taste like? Can you eat the skin? How do you choose, cut and cook it? If you’re asking yourself these questions, rather than counting all the ways you love it, then read on for all the answers!

What is Acorn Squash and What Does it Taste Like?

While acorn squash is closely related to zucchini and other summer squashes, it’s categorized as one of the many winter squashes that start gracing tables during the colder months. This little squash is easy to spot, as it’s round in appearance with a pointy end that resembles the shape of an acorn, hence the name. Its skin is also dull dark green in color with orange markings throughout, while its fleshy inside appears yellow-orange.

Weighing in around 2 pounds, this tasty squash can turn into a meal for two when cut in half, stuffed with ingredients, and baked or roasted in its own half-shells. Acorn squash is also packed full of vitamins and nutrients, while its shape makes it look like pretty little flowers when sliced into rings.

Since the butternut squash gets more attention, you’re probably more familiar with its sweet and nutty flavor. Some say the taste is comparable to sweet potatoes, while others say it tastes as sweet as butterscotch. Compared to butternut squash, acorn squash has a similar but milder sweet and nutty flavor with a more fibrous texture. Just like butternut squash and sweet potatoes, the acorn squash can be enjoyed sweet or savory, or even a combination of both! 

More on Winter Squashes: The F.N. Sharp Guide to Fall Veggie Prep

How to Choose and Store Acorn Squash

When choosing your acorn squash, look for smooth skin with no soft spots and a combination of green and orange tones. Try to avoid acorn squash with more orange than green tones, as they tend to be a bit tougher and more fibrous. You’ll also want one that feels heavy for its size, as it will be loaded with water rather than being dried out. Also be sure to store it in a cool, dark and dry place, such as a pantry, kitchen cabinet or cellar until ready to cook.

If you have raw pieces of acorn squash leftover or want to prep it ahead of time, simply wrap them up in some plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to four days. For cooked acorn squash, you can place it in an air-tight container and store for up to four days in the fridge or up to 12 months in the freezer.

How to Cut and Prepare Acorn Squash

Of all the winter squashes, acorn squash is one of the easiest to cut through, thanks to its soft, smooth skin. So, no need for poking holes and/or baking or microwaving first, here – just give it a good rinse, grab a chef’s knife, utility knife or even the (F.N. Sharp) boning knife, get that cutting board ready and follow the steps below for your desired result!

Get All the F.N. Sharp Essentials: The F.N. Sharp’s 6-Knife Set & Magnetic Knife Block

How to Cut Acorn Squash Into Rings

To cut your acorn squash into rings, follow the steps below:

  1. Lay the squash down on its side and slice off the very top.
  2. Continue cutting into even slices, about an inch thick.
  3. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds and stringy flesh from each ring.

How to Cut Acorn Squash Into Halves

To cut your acorn squash into halves, follow these steps:

  1. Lay the squash down on its side and slice it in half lengthwise from pole to pole.
  2. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds and some of the stringy flesh.
  3. Cook the halves as is or cut along the “valleys” of the squash to slice into wedges.

How to Cut Acorn Squash Into Slices

To cut your acorn squash into slices, follow these steps:

  1. Lay the squash down on its side and slice it in half lengthwise from pole to pole.
  2. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds and some of the stringy flesh.
  3. Turn the halves over cut-side down and begin cutting across the ridge crosswise to create half-moon slices.

How to Cut Acorn Squash Into Wedges

To cut your acorn squash into wedges, follow these steps:

  1. Lay the squash down on its side and slice it in half lengthwise from pole to pole.
  2. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds and some of the stringy flesh.
  3. Turn the halves over cut-side down and cut along the “valleys” of each squash half to slice into wedges.

How to Cut Acorn Squash Into Cubes

To cut your acorn squash into cubes, follow these steps:

  1. Lay the squash down on its side and slice it in half lengthwise from pole to pole.
  2. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds and some of the stringy flesh.
  3. Turn the halves over cut-side down and cut along the “valleys” of each squash half to slice into wedges.
  4. Turn the wedges and start slicing into cubes from one end to the other.

More on Veggie Prep: The A-Z Guide to Cutting Vegetables

How to Cook and Eat Acorn Squash

When it comes to eating acorn squash, you may be wondering if you can and/or should eat the skin. The answer is a hard “Yes!” – especially for acorn squash. While the skins of all winter squash varieties are edible and full of nutrients like vitamin A and fiber, not all of them are super tasty. The acorn squash is one of the exceptions, among others. If you’re curious, Martha Stewart gives the full rundown on the best winter squash skins and how to enjoy them.

As with any veggie, there are plenty of ways to eat acorn squash. You can bake it, steam it, sautée it, puree it, or mash it up to be used as a secret ingredient in a pie or other dessert. But, one of the best ways to enjoy acorn squash, in our humble opinion, is oven-roasted and stuffed with a delicious mixture of sausage, diced red bell pepper, and chopped broccoli rabe florets all topped with melty cheese!

Sound good? Preheat that oven to 420℉, round up your ingredients, grab your F.N. Sharp Boning Knife, get that cutting board ready, and follow along with this video recipe for Oven-Roasted Sausage-Stuffed Acorn Squash 😋

Want to Squash Another Recipe? Check Out This Stuffed Delicata Squash Recipe!



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